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COVID-19
#1
Hope everyone is well and coping with the restricted movement guidelines.
My wife runs the main C-19 isolation Ward here in Sheffield so the inevitable happened.We've both shown symptoms,albeit quite mild.The kids haven't Cool
My wife had to wait THREE days for a test and it's now SIX days later and she still has not had the results.Every nurse who was tested and got results was positive so I think we can assume she's had it Rolleyes
They are no longer testing NHS staff on the Respiratory/C-19 Wards here as they don't have enough swabs Angry

Stay safe everyone.It's going to be a nice Easter weekend.Go out and ride if you're well but do it solo!
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#2
The wife returned to work today.
She finally has her result and as suspected it was positive Rolleyes It only took eight days Huh
That pretty much confirms I've had it too.Our eldest(19) has symptoms this morning Rolleyes 

TBH I'm sort of glad we've had it and got it out of the way.Thankfully we fell into the 95% of cases who only show relatively mild symptoms.Had I been 20+ years older I could see where it would possibly hit harder.
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#3
Just read part of a University of Wisconsin paper that investigated how the common cold virus is transmitted from person to person. As it has many similarities to the Covid-19 organism this could be very relevant to our situation today.

Surprisingly, to me at least, coughing and sneezing were not very effective routes for the virus to spread. Certainly much less effective than physically touching contaminated objects such as door handles, coffee machines and office copiers and then touching your face. There may be a lot of sense to the 'wash your hands' advice.
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#4
(04-18-2020, 03:34 PM)mike the bike Wrote: Just read part of a University of Wisconsin paper that investigated how the common cold virus is transmitted from person to person.  As it has many similarities to the Covid-19 organism this could be very relevant to our situation today.

Surprisingly, to me at least, coughing and sneezing were not very effective routes for the virus to spread.  Certainly much less effective than physically touching contaminated objects such as door handles, coffee machines and office copiers and then touching your face.  There may be a lot of sense to the 'wash your hands' advice.
As a very young soldier (at apprentices college) I had it drummed into me that almost all colds and flu were transmitted via the simple handshake. That was shortly before the lesson on how to wash effectively. They taught us everything then.
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#5
The lockdown has impacted (yes, it's a verb now, apparently) on my cycling in several ways, some of them perhaps less obvious than others.  I mean, we all notice the light-to-non-existent traffic and the fact that the lunatics are still mobile but faster, but more important what's happened to my early morning finds?  Gone seem to be the days when my weekly haul from the roadsides might include rolls of masking tape, an adjustable spanner, pairs of working gloves and a five-pound note.
All of those treasures found their way into my possession during the first few months of this year after presumably falling from moving vehicles.  How I would eagerly scan the gutters as I pedalled my way along the lanes, ever alert for new freebies.  One cold January dawn saw me almost crashing into a complete electric jig-saw, in its case and armed with a magnificent selection of different blades.  It took highly developed riding skills to totter the four miles home holding the bloody thing in one hand and controlling the bike with the other.
But now it's all come to an end, there are no careless carpenters, plumbers and electricians careering around the roads in their pick-ups, oblivious to the rattle of expensive tools hitting the tarmac. They are all confined to base, home schooling their kids and dreaming of regular pay packets.  And I miss them.  And the goodies they shower upon me.  But at least I've got one more reason than the average cyclist to hope for an imminent easing of restrictions, after all I'm almost out of nearly new paint brushes.
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#6
It's pretty much back to normal round here on the roads, although still plenty of families still out on bikes Smile
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#7
I’m
(05-27-2020, 09:40 AM)OETKB-YENTC Wrote: It's pretty much back to normal round here on the roads, although still plenty of families still out on bikes Smile
It’s not really changed that much here at all.Even in the first couple of weeks after Boris announced the restrictions there was no real noticeable difference!
M1 a bit quieter but everywhere else has been pretty much the same.I’ve noticed more people on bikes on the Trans Pennine Trail but that’s probably because it’s hilly here and the TPT is a flat old railway that cuts through.
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#8
Well, further to my previous post bemoaning the lack of early morning finds at the roadside, I now have definitive proof that the economy is on the mend. It's only Tuesday and already my eagle-eye has spotted two decent additions to my bulging stock of unecessary items. Yesterday yielded a pair, yes a pair, of cycling gloves. Slightly worn it's true, but a perfect fit. And today, whilst out riding with my pal Sam, I beat him to a pack of heavy-duty staples. The next time I need to erect a hundred yards of sheep fencing I'll be off to a flying start.
If my luck holds for the rest of the week, who knows what treasures will be mine?
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