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Back to the Tubeture
#1
The tubeless experiment ends now. After what must now be around 5 years running tubeless I have decided to revert to tubes. 
My reasoning is the pure faff of running tubeless, with the sealant refill every 2 months (it does not last 3) and the sheer time expended should you need to fit that emergency spare tube (an hour to scrape the sealant off the inside of the tyre). 
I worked out that it takes me around 3 minutes elapsed time to swap out an inner tube and get going again whereas last weekend I spent an hour by the side of the road fitting the emergency spare. Checking the inside of the tyre I spotted 2 accumulations of latex indicating 2 punctures that I escaped but that only would have taken 6 minutes to fix. 
I know that it is said that running tubeless eliminates the risk of snakebite flats however in over 50 years on tubed tyres and tubs I never once had a snakebite flat.
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#2
Aah Colin, we approach this matter from different ends of the subject. I am, in fact, just setting out on the road to tubeless and am curious to see how it will pan out. I do love technology, so much that I used to teach it, and despite my advanced age I try to keep up with developments. Like you I have never suffered a 'snake bite' flat but, even discounting that dubious advantage, I shall press ahead.
Yesterday I unpacked my new Hutchinson tubeless tyres, mounted them on equally new Hunt rims and attempted a dry inflation with my track pump. Not a hope; there were so many leaks I couldn't count them. So I bunged a tube in each tyre, inflated them rock solid and left them overnight to adopt a more friendly shape. And, I'm pleased to say, they did. My next attempt to pump 'em up without sealant was a great success and took little effort. So I pressed ahead with installing Stan's gloop, re-inflated them to a rideable pressure and there are no signs, not one, of leaks. I retired to the garden for a little light sunbathing, positively glowing in the glory of a morning well spent.
Tomorrow will probably see the finish of my bike build, just the odds and ends to do, and on Monday I'll take the machine and its tubeless wheels for a spin around the lanes. It could, of course, all go tits-up in any one of several ways but, whatever happens, it will be an experience I wouldn't want to miss.
I have considerable sympathy with your opinions Colin, not every experiment ends up in progress. And it's a foolish man who can't recognise disappointment and revert to what works. Whether I shall follow you down that road remains in the hands of the bicycle gods.
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#3
Mike, not wanting to rain on your parade but please remember to pack an emergency tube and for what it's worth it is also worth packing a piece of an eraser. If the worst should happen that piece of eraser will help with the process of removing the gloop from the tyre carcass prior to fitting the emergency tube.
If you have the same experience with tubeless as I did you will need to check your pressures before each ride and also check the retaining nuts on the valves, they have a nasty habit of working loose, even when lightly tightened with a Navy spanner (pliers).
I too have been riding on Hutch tyres on my summer wheels (just fitted) but the ones that prompted my reversion were Scwalbe Pro 1's on my winter wheels. The Hutches are virtually brand spankers so it will be a while before I can try a more supple tyre, I'm thinking graphene next time around.
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#4
After seeing friends struggles with Tubeless on MTBs I decided to give it a miss.The only benefit I could see was that it allowed them to run very low pressures(when they finally got it right) so for me the cons far outweighed the pros and I've never given it much thought since!
I stopped/sold the MTBs 3 years ago so I don't know whether Tubeless has changed or improved since then.No doubt the wheel builder will want to discuss it when we talk about my new wheels.I will listen obviously but as of now I'm still going with tubes..........

Good luck with your adventure Mike you might actually love it Cool
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#5
(05-03-2020, 08:45 AM)Colin the Giant Killer Wrote: Mike, not wanting to rain on your parade but please remember to pack an emergency tube and for what it's worth it is also worth packing a piece of an eraser. If the worst should happen that piece of eraser will help with the process of removing the gloop from the tyre carcass prior to fitting the emergency tube.
If you have the same experience with tubeless as I did you will need to check your pressures before each ride and also check the retaining nuts on the valves, they have a nasty habit of working loose, even when lightly tightened with a Navy spanner (pliers).
I too have been riding on Hutch tyres on my summer wheels (just fitted) but the ones that prompted my reversion were Scwalbe Pro 1's on my winter wheels. The Hutches are virtually brand spankers so it will be a while before I can try a more supple tyre, I'm thinking graphene next time around.
Cheers for the advice Col, I'll remember the tip about the eraser.  It's a shame tubeless didn't work out for you, and  indeed it may not for me, but I'll give it a decent trial before making a decision.  In essence I would rather have tried it and then backed off, than never tried it at all.

(05-03-2020, 10:16 AM)100%JR Wrote: After seeing friends struggles with Tubeless on MTBs I decided to give it a miss.The only benefit I could see was that it allowed them to run very low pressures(when they finally got it right) so for me the cons far outweighed the pros and I've never given it much thought since!
I stopped/sold the MTBs 3 years ago so I don't know whether Tubeless has changed or improved since then.No doubt the wheel builder will want to discuss it when we talk about my new wheels.I will listen obviously but as of now I'm still going with tubes..........

Good luck with your adventure Mike you might actually love it Cool

I regularly talk to road riders who ditched their tubes and would never go back; this is partly what decided me to have a bash. That and the fact I was building a new bike anyway so there was very little extra expense involved.  I'm sure that there has been loads of progress with tyres and sealants over the last few years.  Although I'm fascinated by the march of technology I'm also a believer in the simple life, if this costs me significant precious time
( after all, I don't have too much left ) the experiment will come to a sudden end.
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#6
Well, two months of my tubeless experiment have passed so it's probably time to put my thoughts in order and assess developments.  The first thing I've noticed is ..... not much.  Despite anticipating lots of exciting bike rides on my new Hutchinson rubber, complete with explosions and deflations, what I've had is just more of the same.  I wouldn't normally expect any flat tubes in two months of summer riding and that's exactly what I've had without the tubes too.  There have been absolutely no signs of pressure loss, no tell-tale white stains on the tyres, no unexpected low readings.  I think it's safe to say I haven't suffered from adopting new technology. 

And although I was warned that tubeless tyres would need more regular top-ups of air, perhaps every few days, I can't say I've had that trouble.  True, they needed a blast from the pump about three days after initial fitting, but since then I've trundled along with my customary hi-tech system.  This involve squeezing the tyres between finger and thumb before every ride and pumping 'em up maybe once a month.  My friend Olive reckons it's because I ride every day and this keeps the sealant flowing around the carcass.  She may be right, she usually is.

Talking of sealant, this morning I deflated the front tyre and stuck that fiddly little tube through the valve and into the void, sucking up some of Uncle Stan's fluid.  There seems to be plenty left and it's encouragingly sloshy, so I've decided to leave well alone for another month at least.  And, bless it's little heart, the tyre quickly re-inflated using the track pump.

One other small thing that has registered on my horizon is the complete lack of cuts and nicks on the tread of Mr Hutchinson's finest.  I've become accustomed to bike tyres, even the grossly over-priced versions, picking up signs of damage literally from the off.  But these are still like new, I couldn't find anything to comment on, except the lack of things to comment on.  That's got to be good, even if this is still very early days.

Are they more comfortable than tubed?  Not really.  At least I can't detect any difference.  Maybe if I was riding off-road a bit more I'd get this benefit from chucking away my tubes and dropping the pressures, but I rarely venture onto the soft stuff, I fall off too easily.

So, there you have it.  In a nutshell I haven't been troubled by flats, slow or sudden, and I haven't felt any more comfortable at road pressures.  Life goes on.
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#7
Interesting. I don't think I'm tempted yet - I didn't realise you had to replace the gunk every 2 months. Sounds like ore grief than it solves!
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#8
(07-02-2020, 07:12 PM)OETKB-YENTC Wrote: Interesting. I don't think I'm tempted yet - I didn't realise you had to replace the gunk every 2 months. Sounds like ore grief than it solves!

Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that the gloop lasted only a couple of months.  There seems to be little agreement about its lifespan, the makers claim anything up to 8 months while Colin of this parish reckons maybe two.  The science says it solidifies more quickly in cold, damp conditions but that apart, it's anyone's guess.
I shall check mine again in another month or so, but mostly out of curiosity.
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#9
Still not tempted!
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#10
Big day for the tubeless experiment, last Saturday.  I collected a 6 or 7 mm gash in the front tyre which caused instant deflation and a near-total loss of Uncle Stan's sealant.  The culprit was a flint, presumably deposited by the tractor that left its muddy prints everywhere.  I can honestly say this was the worst damage ever inflicted on any of my tyres in the last sixty years.  I tried a plug, which held up for about a minute before being expelled at some speed by the pressure of the CO2 canister.  So it was in with a tube, which lasted for the weekend and two hundred miles without further trouble.  

Back in the garage I'm trying to plug it again, this time with a larger anchovy and a good dollop of vulcanising solution.  After letting it dry overnight I'll attempt to inflate it again.  It either will or it won't and if the answer is negative I'll order another Hutchinson 'cause I'm really impressed by them and no road bike tyre could have withstood the attack of that particular flint.

The experiment rolls on, wounded but not defeated.
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